Archive for the ‘Exhibitions’ Category

Did Barney Bubbles forge the Psychedelic Furs/John Piper connection?

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

//Top: Abstract 1, John Piper, 1935; above: Front cover, Danger, The Psychedelic Furs, CBS, 1982//

One of the hallmarks of Barney Bubbles’ body of work is the elevation of the methods of art historicism.

While perusing a copy of the early 80s exhibition catalogue Circle: Constructive Art In Britain 1934-40 last week I came across John Piper’s Abstract 1, one of a series of investigations into abstraction by the artist in this period.

//Front cover, Circle: Constructive Art In Britain 1934-40, edited by Jeremy Lewison, Kettle’s Yard Gallery, 1982//

//Reproduction of Abstract 1 in Circle (Left) with sections of John Cecil Stephenson’s Painting, 1937, and Freidrich Vordemberge-Gildewart’s Composition no 94, 1935 (right)//

Abstract 1 in particular chimes with the Bubbles’ painting incorporated into the design for the front cover of The Psychedelic Furs’ single Danger.

//Abstract 1, oil and commercial paint on canvas, 917cm x 1065cm, Tate Britain//

//Composition, oil on canvas, 55.4 x 68 cm, 1937, Ashmolean//

//Abstract 1935, gouache and collage, 1935, Pallant House Gallery//

The Furs’ single was released in 1982, the year Circle was mounted at Cambridge gallery Kettle’s Yard to reflect on the outpourings of pre-WWII modernism from Piper, as well as such artists as Naum Gabo, Barbara Hepworth, Henry Moore and Ben Nicholson.

As Bubbles’ work in his final years grew increasingly reductive, his preoccupations became aligned with those of early 20th century artists, in particular regarding the simplification of natural forms to geometric essentials.

This was combined with his fascination for constructing faces from unusual elements – as explored a few years back here – in the Danger design.

I don’t know whether Bubbles visited Circle or was even aware of the show, but it’s pleasurable to contemplate the ways in which this master designer invigorated his work – en route achieving maximum engagement with his audience – by drawing on the relatively recent history of art and design.

Buy copies of Circle: Constructive Art In Britain 1934-40 here.

 

 

 

 

Magick is Freedom! Existence Is Unhappiness + OZ #12

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

//Magick Is Freedom!, one of a series of 24 A0 posters by Graham Wood which were on show at Scarlett Gallery, Stockholm, last year//

British designer Graham Wood’s 2012 exhibition Magick Is Freedom! was inspired by a single design created by Barney Bubbles and David Wills with a team of contributors in the late 60s.

Entitled Existence Is Unhappiness, this formed one side of the two double-facing fold-out poster inserts with issue 12 of underground magazine Oz in May 1968.